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firepink
03-29-2008, 01:02 PM
Any wildlife/plant geeks out there? I'm looking for lists in English to try to identify stuff I see when I'm hiking. Birds are relatively covered by Wiki, but I'm having problems finding stuff about flowers and trees. I don't tend to see many mammals, but when I do it's generally just a chipmunk or squirrel and I'm not too worried about finding keys for them.

List of passerine birds of Korea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_passerine_birds_of_Korea)
List of non-passerine birds of Korea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_non-passerine_birds_of_Korea)

The Biological Research Information Center (BRIC (http://bric.postech.ac.kr/)) looks like it would have good info, but when you're in the English language portion of the site and click over to the search, it switches to Korean - and my Korean isn't good enough to figure it out.

Finally, I found links to Naver sites for birds (http://100.naver.com/bird/search.php?sg=m), insects (http://100.naver.com/insect/search_list.php?themecode=0101), and plants (http://100.naver.com/plant/search_list.php?sw=a&p=1). They provide Korean and Latin names, and sometimes English names as well.

If anyone knows of any websites or field guides that would be helpful, English or otherwise, please share!

Hypoxic
03-29-2008, 03:00 PM
The most prominent field guide to flora is Beautiful Wildflowers in Korea. It's published by the Korea Plant Conservation Society, provides taxonomical and botanical characteristics of the flora covered, has beautiful colour photos, and it's all in Anglais. There is also a field guide to Korean birds available in English, but as you pointed out, the wiki is pretty good and accurate (even for a wiki). I highly recommend getting in touch with Birds Korea, if you haven't already. The operator, Nial Moores, is a top shelf birder. He knows his stuff. They have tours and a lot of info on their site. www.birdskorea.org

Mammal-wise, you'd have to set up some time to stay in the mountains, preferrably the big ones, with the intent of searching for them. The community of mammals in the local ecosystems are continually facing serious threat of poaching and habitat loss. I'm in close contact with the Moon Bears Organization, and all research indicates that there are roughly ten to fifteen Asiatic black bears left in the wild here. They are trying to get a sanctuary established, hopefully in Jirisan. Korean biodiversity is thinning at a very alarming rate.

Hope this is all helpful.

choss monkey
04-04-2008, 01:16 AM
I keep reading about that scary canal proposal, and it just came up on the birds of korea site as well. :(

does anyone know what poisonous spiders, snakes, and plants are there? i can always bring my own supply of poison ivy, and nettle if need be.

skinsk
04-04-2008, 12:05 PM
several local museums and aboretums, even korea forest service offices (sometimes signs and park offices in the national, provincial and other parks) have info. . . in latin at least, but some in english. . . i was just at a natural history museum in uiseong that was very well done-- photos and graphs of evolution from dinos to today, and a nice display of bugs-- which is most of the wildlife these days. i've seen a few brochures at info booths on highway rest stops. . . next time i see something, i'll try to grab you one!

Hypoxic
04-09-2008, 03:34 AM
I keep reading about that scary canal proposal, and it just came up on the birds of korea site as well. :(

does anyone know what poisonous spiders, snakes, and plants are there? i can always bring my own supply of poison ivy, and nettle if need be.

Yes, it is certain that the Grand Canal will affect birds species, particularly aquatic species that rely on inland water systems. Nial Moores and the rest of Birds Korea are significant in protesting the canal. Good on 'em.

Well, all spiders - save a very few species compared to the total known species - are venomous. Rule of thumb for spiders: if you're bitten, seek attention regardless. Just the same, your chances of encountering a deadly venonmous spider here are small.

I've met Koreans who've adamantly insisted that there are no venomous snakes in Korea; however, they're either misinformed or in some kind of odd serpent denial (also strangely, I've met Koreans who insist there are no rats in Korea. Regarding this, basically, garbage = rats; I've seen rats several times here, as recently as last week in Yeoido). Korea does indeed have venomous snakes, including adders.

ricardo
04-09-2008, 06:12 PM
Hypoxic, what are the odds of seeing a moon bear in soraksan (in the wide rock riverbed near the main entrance) under a full moon in late november? i saw a creature waddling away from me that fits their characteristics.

Hypoxic
04-09-2008, 11:50 PM
Hypoxic, what are the odds of seeing a moon bear in soraksan (in the wide rock riverbed near the main entrance) under a full moon in late november? i saw a creature waddling away from me that fits their characteristics.

Practically nil, sadly.

Can you describe it more clearly? Size? Sounds? What were you doing at the time?

ricardo
04-10-2008, 06:31 PM
rats!
sounds: i heard nothing besides a few rocks it was knocking loose.
size: 1.5' tall, 1' wide, short legs, black/very dark, no tail i could see. i've seen these bears in the portland zoo so i'm basing the characteristics on that. i guess it was medium/large dog size with short legs though i'm positive it wasn't a dog.
doing: i was sitting 30' from the vegetation line (also the road) around midnight under a full moon. the 'creature' was about 50' from me waddling away towards the river. the rocky floodplain was very wide (150-200') at the time and the river was low enough to hop over it.

this was a while ago so i can't remember much 'clearly'. any ideas? i see so little wildlife (besides birds) that moon bear or not...i was pretty excited.

ricardo
04-10-2008, 06:33 PM
The most prominent field guide to flora is Beautiful Wildflowers in Korea. It's published by the Korea Plant Conservation Society, provides taxonomical and botanical characteristics of the flora covered, has beautiful colour photos, and it's all in Anglais.

if anyone finds this book, please pick up a copy for me and i will gladly compensate for your troubles (i.e., treats from the commissary).
actually, i'd prefer a true flora (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flora) (pure latin names of trees -> algae (or something narrowed down to class or order (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_classification)) with taxonomic descriptions/drawings) in english. this can run up to $70 in the states but it's a language i prefer. if you see one and are wondering if you'll get stuck with an expensive book you don't want, i assure you that i'll pull through.
on that note...i'd also love an english dichotomous key on korean fungi!

Hypoxic
04-17-2008, 12:48 AM
rats!
sounds: i heard nothing besides a few rocks it was knocking loose.
size: 1.5' tall, 1' wide, short legs, black/very dark, no tail i could see. i've seen these bears in the portland zoo so i'm basing the characteristics on that. i guess it was medium/large dog size with short legs though i'm positive it wasn't a dog.
doing: i was sitting 30' from the vegetation line (also the road) around midnight under a full moon. the 'creature' was about 50' from me waddling away towards the river. the rocky floodplain was very wide (150-200') at the time and the river was low enough to hop over it.

this was a while ago so i can't remember much 'clearly'. any ideas? i see so little wildlife (besides birds) that moon bear or not...i was pretty excited.

Well, I wouldn't say right out that it wasn't a bear. Your description doesn't match any dog I know of except a Newfoundland, and that seems unlikely. If it was the size you remember it to be it may have been. I'm skeptical that it was a bear, but it would be awesome if it was (for you and the bears). Although the majority of wild black bears are believed to be in Jirisan (all dozen or so of them; though two were unaccounted for during this past hibernation season), there are reports of them being near the DMZ and in the Seoraksan region.

Hypoxic
04-17-2008, 12:51 AM
if anyone finds this book, please pick up a copy for me and i will gladly compensate for your troubles (i.e., treats from the commissary).
actually, i'd prefer a true flora (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flora) (pure latin names of trees -> algae (or something narrowed down to class or order (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_classification)) with taxonomic descriptions/drawings) in english. this can run up to $70 in the states but it's a language i prefer. if you see one and are wondering if you'll get stuck with an expensive book you don't want, i assure you that i'll pull through.
on that note...i'd also love an english dichotomous key on korean fungi!

The book's available at Kyobo in Seoul. 30,000 won, if I recall.